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August 24, 1953
Walter O’Malley tells Major League Baseball’s Executive Council of a recent conversation he had with a prominent citizen of Southern California regarding moving the Dodgers to Los Angeles. “(The person) is a leader in politics and is well fixed financially. This man, whose name I cannot reveal, assured me that if the Brooklyn club were transferred to Los Angeles, a modern, commodious stadium would be built for it,” said O’Malley. O’Malley added, “The man who wrote to me that Los Angeles was very eager and ready, to come into the majors and would not accept just any old club.”1



August 24, 1954
The Long Island Star-Journal reports that Walter O’Malley announced that the Dodgertown Summer Camp for Boys will be held in 1955 and applications were already being accepted. The camp was for boys ages 10 to 16 and they received baseball instruction along with participating in all the activities Dodgertown had to offer, including swimming, boating, archery, fishing, crafts and nature study.2



August 24, 1955
Sidney Squire, the Executive Deputy to the Secretary of State for the State of New York receives a letter from Walter O’Malley. Squire had sent O’Malley a cartoon of O’Malley, wearing a dress, and carrying the Brooklyn Bum in the way a mother would carry a child as they escape bloodhounds. The cartoon was meant to be a humorous reference to the Dodgers leaving Brooklyn to play seven games in New Jersey. O’Malley responded in good humor by writing Squire, “I enjoyed your letter but even more the cartoon which I had not seen before. The matter seems to be in good hands at the moment and we will see what comes of it. There was a time when I thought I might have to ask Gov. Harriman to get into the act as I know he will want to be helpful.”



August 24, 1955
Walter O’Malley thanks architect William Lescaze for his offer to help in the design of a new Dodger Stadium in Brooklyn. Lescaze is given credit for introducing an International style of architecture to the United States and is responsible for the Philadelphia Savings Fund Society Building, known as the first modern United States skyscraper. The skyscraper today exists as the Loews Philadelphia Hotel. Lescaze is also known for his design of office and home products as chairs and table lamps.



August 24, 1963
The Sporting News reports in a note that Dodger President Walter O’Malley had been urging a joint pool of major league umpires instead of separate umpires for the National and American League.3



August 24, 1965
Jack Warner, head of Warner Bros. film studios, hears of Walter O’Malley’s role on the television show “Branded” and sends a telegram from Antibes, France. “Dear Walter” wrote Warner, “Just learned you are getting into my racket. If I had known you wanted to be an actor would have signed you up for our pictures. Be back soon. Stay on top. Best to Kay.”



August 24, 1965
Columnist Rube Samuelsen writes in the San Francisco Chronicle on this day, “By the way, did you know....that (Walter) O’Malley earned 32 merit badges when he was a Boy Scout?”4

1 The Sporting News, September 2, 1953
2 Long Island Star-Journal, August 24, 1954
3 The Sporting News, August 24, 1963
4 San Francisco Chronicle, August 24, 1965

 
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