Wyman's Historic Efforts Bring Dodgers to Los Angeles

By Brent Shyer
  • Courtesy of University of Southern California, on behalf of the USC Specialized Libraries and Archival Collections
  • On September 1, 1955, Roz Wyman, Los Angeles City Councilwoman, sends a letter to Dodger President Walter O’Malley asking if she and Ed Roybal, another member of the Council, could meet with him in New York. Wyman wanted to discuss the possibility of bringing the Dodgers to Los Angeles. O’Malley, who was focused on trying to find a way to build a dome stadium in Brooklyn, wrote her and declined her offer.Click image for a larger viewOn September 1, 1955, Roz Wyman, Los Angeles City Councilwoman, sends a letter to Dodger President Walter O’Malley asking if she and Ed Roybal, another member of the Council, could meet with him in New York. Wyman wanted to discuss the possibility of bringing the Dodgers to Los Angeles. O’Malley, who was focused on trying to find a way to build a dome stadium in Brooklyn, wrote her and declined her offer.
  • A proud day indeed for Los Angeles, as its Mayor Norris Poulson and City Council members celebrate the Dodgers acceptance of the city’s contract offer on October 8, 1957. First row behind Poulson (left to right) are council members Ransom Callicott, Roz Wyman, Gordon Hahn and Charles Navarro, while behind them (left to right) are John Gibson, L.E Timberlake, James Corman and Everett Burkhalter.A proud day indeed for Los Angeles, as its Mayor Norris Poulson and City Council members celebrate the Dodgers acceptance of the city’s contract offer on October 8, 1957. First row behind Poulson (left to right) are council members Ransom Callicott, Roz Wyman, Gordon Hahn and Charles Navarro, while behind them (left to right) are John Gibson, L.E Timberlake, James Corman and Everett Burkhalter.Courtesy of University of Southern California, on behalf of the USC Specialized Libraries and Archival Collections
  • The Dodger Convair 440 airplane arrives at the Los Angeles International Airport carrying club executives and select players as the welcoming committee is ready to greet the contingent on October 23, 1957. Because of strong headwinds, which necessitated a fuel stop, the plane arrived more than two hours late, but it did not put a damper on the celebration as bands played and the Dodger personnel were properly welcomed to their new home. Wyman meets O’Malley for the first time on the steps of the airplane.The Dodger Convair 440 airplane arrives at the Los Angeles International Airport carrying club executives and select players as the welcoming committee is ready to greet the contingent on October 23, 1957. Because of strong headwinds, which necessitated a fuel stop, the plane arrived more than two hours late, but it did not put a damper on the celebration as bands played and the Dodger personnel were properly welcomed to their new home. Wyman meets O’Malley for the first time on the steps of the airplane.
  • Press Release, Brooklyn DodgersClick image for a larger viewPress Release, Brooklyn Dodgers
  • A portion of the 1958 brochure in favor of Proposition B. A “Yes For Proposition B” vote would confirm the previously-approved contract between the City of Los Angeles and the Dodgers.A portion of the 1958 brochure in favor of Proposition B. A “Yes For Proposition B” vote would confirm the previously-approved contract between the City of Los Angeles and the Dodgers.
  • The “3 a.m. Plan” emerges from Walter O’Malley’s lack of sleep as he wrestles with options for where the Los Angeles Dodgers would play in the 1958 season. The plan enabled the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum to be used with minimal disruption for the other tenants. The baseball diamond was to be shoehorned in the closed end of the Coliseum, giving home plate a north-east orientation. The plan called for a short 251-foot fence in left field, but with a 42-foot high screen to prevent an onslaught of home runs.The “3 a.m. Plan” emerges from Walter O’Malley’s lack of sleep as he wrestles with options for where the Los Angeles Dodgers would play in the 1958 season. The plan enabled the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum to be used with minimal disruption for the other tenants. The baseball diamond was to be shoehorned in the closed end of the Coliseum, giving home plate a north-east orientation. The plan called for a short 251-foot fence in left field, but with a 42-foot high screen to prevent an onslaught of home runs.
  • Members of the Los Angeles City Council in discussions with the Dodgers: (L-R) John Holland, Harold Henry, Patrick McGee, Karl Rundberg, Ernest Debs, Jim Corman, Ransom Callicott, Gordon Hahn, Everett Burkhalter, along with Dodger Counsel Henry J. Walsh, and Councilwoman Roz Wyman.Members of the Los Angeles City Council in discussions with the Dodgers: (L-R) John Holland, Harold Henry, Patrick McGee, Karl Rundberg, Ernest Debs, Jim Corman, Ransom Callicott, Gordon Hahn, Everett Burkhalter, along with Dodger Counsel Henry J. Walsh, and Councilwoman Roz Wyman.Courtesy of University of Southern California, on behalf of the USC Specialized Libraries and Archival Collections
  • Proud parents Eugene and Roz Wyman are all smiles on the birth of daughter Betty Lynn on April 5, 1958. Thanks to Councilwoman Wyman’s leadership, the first Dodger game played in Los Angeles took place on April 18 at the Memorial Coliseum.Proud parents Eugene and Roz Wyman are all smiles on the birth of daughter Betty Lynn on April 5, 1958. Thanks to Councilwoman Wyman’s leadership, the first Dodger game played in Los Angeles took place on April 18 at the Memorial Coliseum.Courtesy of University of Southern California, on behalf of the USC Specialized Libraries and Archival Collections
  • Councilwoman Roz Wyman buys tickets for the St. Louis Hawks-Philadelphia Warriors basketball game at new Los Angeles Sports Arena on September 30, 1959 from Arthur Pollack, chairman of the L.A. Newspaper Publishers Association. Wyman was also instrumental in bringing the Lakers from Minneapolis to Los Angeles.Councilwoman Roz Wyman buys tickets for the St. Louis Hawks-Philadelphia Warriors basketball game at new Los Angeles Sports Arena on September 30, 1959 from Arthur Pollack, chairman of the L.A. Newspaper Publishers Association. Wyman was also instrumental in bringing the Lakers from Minneapolis to Los Angeles.Courtesy of University of Southern California, on behalf of the USC Specialized Libraries and Archival Collections
  • Roz Wyman’s parents Sarah and Oscar Wiener, shown here on their honeymoon in Catalina, California, operated a family drugstore on 9th Street and Western Avenue in Los Angeles.Roz Wyman’s parents Sarah and Oscar Wiener, shown here on their honeymoon in Catalina, California, operated a family drugstore on 9th Street and Western Avenue in Los Angeles.
  • Roz and Eugene Wyman are all smiles and the proud parents of newborn son, Robert Allen, at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital on January 17, 1960.Roz and Eugene Wyman are all smiles and the proud parents of newborn son, Robert Allen, at Cedars of Lebanon Hospital on January 17, 1960.Courtesy of University of Southern California, on behalf of the USC Specialized Libraries and Archival Collections
  • Los Angeles Democrat newsletter of May 1, 1961 reviews the 1960 Democratic National Convention rally at which candidate John F. Kennedy gives his acceptance speech for the presidential nomination. Roz Wyman suggested that the rally and nomination be held outdoors at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, instead of indoors at the L.A. Sports Arena, and the risky idea proved to be an overwhelming success.Los Angeles Democrat newsletter of May 1, 1961 reviews the 1960 Democratic National Convention rally at which candidate John F. Kennedy gives his acceptance speech for the presidential nomination. Roz Wyman suggested that the rally and nomination be held outdoors at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, instead of indoors at the L.A. Sports Arena, and the risky idea proved to be an overwhelming success.